Note: some of these courses count simply as course electives, as one is only required to complete 30 hours of EMST coursework, and I took…a bit more than that. I just love these courses and the professors in this department, and even when I graduate, I do not think I will feel as though I’ve run out of things to learn about this industry.

  • Introduction to Media and Pop-Culture* (Spring 2018)
    • EMST3010 serves as our introduction to the major and course of study and covers the basic historic and industrial contexts with which we can approach television, film, and general media. To say I adored this course would be an understatement; I came into college still weighed down by journalistic aspirations and was not sure that entertainment would be the right path for me – sure I liked it, but could I carve out a career for myself? Through this course, and the introduction to amazing professors within the department, I could suddenly see myself in this industry I’ve always loved so much.
    • I elected to Honors option this course, writing a twelve-page paper on the industrial and content factors that drove the relative success of One Tree Hill and The O.C..The fact that I got to do this, and actually have people receive it as critically as I treated it while writing, is one of the many reasons I came to adore my major.
  • Travel Writing* (Summer 2018)
    • JOUR5770 is a course offered during a summer study abroad, in my specific situation serving as Travel Journalism Basics in Munich, Germany. This course covered all of the basics to travel writing, while also introducing students to an immersive introduction to broadcast video and news. At the time I applied to this course, I still was not sure that I did not want to major in journalism after all, and I was only a German minor. By the time I actually boarded the plane, I was assured in my choice in double majoring in Entertainment & Media Studies and German, and used this opportunity to build my experience in both German language and cultural studies, as well as basic video editing and filming experience. My personal project focused on the film and television industry in Munich.
  • Introduction to Production Basics (Spring 2019)
    • EMST3210/3210L is our first required course of the major, teaching us the, well, basics to production (are you shocked?). All things considered, the fear I had approaching this course is one of my deepest regrets in my undergraduate career. I was afraid because I had never been a part of a “real production” before, and was worried I was going to fail to keep up with my cohort, all of whom I was convinced had probably worked on movie sets for Marvel or something (some of them had, but that is neither here nor there). My point is that I realized early on that this course was simply an opportunity to learn, and in giving it the effort it deserves, it really was one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had thus far.
    • We each had a role in every stage of production and were able to learn through producing a five-minute film. I personally served as line-producer, locations manager, unit production manager, and colorist, but completed knowledge assessments of every role due to my position as UPM.
  • Elements of Narrative (Spring 2019)
    • Taken in conjunction with EMST3210, EMST3510 focuses on the actual construction of narratives themselves, dissecting core factors of stories and storytelling. This class gave us the opportunity to craft stories in various media, whether it be five-second filmed narratives, television treatments, or long-form comic books. I loved this class, and feel more secure in my general ability as a storyteller.
  • History and Analysis of Digital Media (Spring 2019)
    • EMST5440 was my first elective in the major, and I elected to take it on top of my introductory courses because my love for this major comes from my emphasis on television. UGA has a wonderful film department, and while I do love film (wait until my next course entry), my course of study has always centered around my love for long-form storytelling.
    • Through the completion of this course, I was able to curtail the assignments to help me improve my research skills. I completed projects using our archive of TV Guide issues as well as various trade press magazines (such as Variety). My biggest project was definitely the “Peabody paper,” for which I found supplementary documents from a submission to the prestigious Peabody Awards, housed in the Peabody Awards Collection in the Special Collections Library. This project (see The Great Space Coaster and the Commodification of Children’s Television: The Ideology and Legislation that Defined 1980s Children’s Programming”) was not only important to me because it helped hone my research skills and established my research emphasis, but it also assisted my gaining employment in the Walter J. Brown Media Archives and Peabody Awards Collection as a student archivist in the fall of 2019. 
  • International Film Markets (Summer 2019)
    • EMST4040 is one of the two courses offered through the Cannes Film Festival Maymester. Essentially, in addition to attending the Cannes Film Festival, we learned about the various international film markets and created our own international film production and pitched it as our final project.
  • Critical Writing and Reviewing* (Summer 2019)
    • EMST 5590, taken concurrently with EMST4040, is a writing intensive course focused on critical reviewing of films, specifically those seen at the Cannes Film Festival. See Professional Travels for more details and Articles for my writing samples.
  • Writing for Digital Media* (Fall 2019)
    • EMST3110 serves as an introductory course to screenwriting basics, with our course focusing specifically on writing six-episode web series in groups of three. I absolutely adored this class; I really enjoyed the way my professor framed it, and I became very good friends with my co-writers. See “If We Were a Movie” in my scripts for more information. We were initially planning on filming the web series, but as of right now that has been postponed indefinitely due to production safety guidelines in light of COVID.
  • Media Audiences (Fall 2019)
    • EMST4320 is another elective, and it is perhaps still my favorite of all of my EMST electives. We covered audiences as both an industrial construct and studied active audiences and their behaviors in order to best understand how to create content, and how to study what audiences do with the content they receive. A lot of my research has a heavy emphasis on audiences, so learning about it in an official course was just amazing.
  • Global Industries* (Spring 2020)
    • EMST 4410 is yet another elective, concentrating on transnational media and the global media industry. I honors-optioned this class by continuing my independent research into the Skam franchise, for this class specifically focusing on the industrial effects of the franchise. I really loved this class; unfortunately, this was one of my spring 2020 classes, so it was definitely altered, but I still had a great time in the class. My friends and I pitched an adaptation of a Chinese drama to an American audience, and then wrote the pilot script for our second test grade. I definitely learned a lot and, considering that I want to go into a transnational field of some kind, I’m so happy I took this course.
  • Innovation in Entertainment (Spring 2020)
    • EMST5990 was designed to resemble real-life business projects, with each student group creating and pitching a product that would innovate the entertainment industry in some way.
    • Our topic was interactivity in video, and my group pitched our streaming extension “Club House,” aimed at integrating the parasocial behaviors associated with dual-screen viewership into a single screen experience. Pitch deck can be furnished upon request.
  • The Peabody Archive and Genre Television (Summer 2020)
    • Ah yes. The great dashed plans of the summer of 2020. While I was supposed to be in Oxford during this summer, I was extremely lucky to be able to enroll in EMST3012E with one of my favorite professors from the department. We completed the required viewings and readings every week and then wrote small essays discussing the role of genre in each of the Peabody Award winners that we watched.
    • For my final paper, I wrote about the role of genre and storytelling in Switched at Birth (“‘Finding Your Place at the Table’: Melodrama as a Vehicle of Identity Exploration in ABC Family’s Switched at Birth), as well as discussing the show’s stumbling history in regard to representation.

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